Quick Facts

Established

   

1923

Legatees

   

550

Widows

   

13,085

Contact Details

Melbourne Legacy

293 Swanston Street Melbourne VIC 3000

Postal address: GPO Box 4312 Melbourne VIC 3001

Phone: (03) 8626 0500

Email: info@
legacymelb.com.au

 

News

News - Melbourne Legacy


Lest We Forget - 2016



Media Releases - 2016



Personal Effort Wins National Award


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Mia Decleva, 14, from Overnewton Anglican Community College in Taylors Lakes was awarded the national winner of the 2016 Legacy Junior Public Speaking Award held in Adelaide in mid-November.

Her speech, ‘Personal Effort’ was a stand-out and was about her grandfather Charlie, and his experience coming to Australia from Europe as an immigrant. Born in 1949 and arriving in Australia with very little as a four-year old with his family, Charlie lost his father as a teenager and worked hard to make a new life in Australia. Charlie is a successful farmer and businessman and he and his wife have three daughters and two grandchildren (including Mia) who have the benefit of good education, prosperous careers and a secure home.

“His personal effort pulled him through as he always had the future of his family in his heart and mind,” Mia said. “His is my role model and my hero.”

Mia’s parents and her grandparents were in the audience and were beaming with pride when she won the award.

Eight finalists from states across Australia had to give a five minute prepared speech, followed by a two minute impromptu speech on ‘Making a difference’.

“We are thrilled that Mia took out the top prize,” Melbourne Legacy President Mr Graeme Plumridge said.

Mia won a $500 voucher and the 2016 Legacy Junior Public speaking Award trophy. Each of the finalists also received a medallion and an Oxford dictionary.

The runner-up was Erin Galbraith – Marist College, Tasmania and third place was Sophie Mok – Pymble Ladies’ College, NSW. Congratulations to all the students that competed in the 2016 National Final of the Legacy Junior Public Speaking Award.

For further information, please contact Janice Mascini: Ph: 0409 862 389 or email
Janice Mascini

To download a copy of the media release, please click here

Legacy's Laneway Art Honours Veterans


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Legacy’ ANZAC Centenary Street Art Mural is a unique contribution to Melbourne’s laneway culture which honours Australia’s brave service men and women.

Started in 2014, the mural is on the back wall of Legacy House in Drewery Lane, Melbourne. It includes hand-made mosaics of WWI veteran and Legacy founder, Sir Stanley Savige; WWI legend General Sir John Monash; and long-time Legacy supporter and former Junior Legatee, Ron Barassi.

These are complemented by hundreds of hand-made tiles created by members of the Legacy family including widows, families, children, people with disabilities, supporters and volunteers, as well members of the Australian Defence Force and community groups.

“Each of these tiles is a personal expression of respect and admiration for the ANZACS and in many cases in remembrance of family members who served our country,” Melbourne Legacy President Graeme Plumridge said.

“This evolving artwork is a lasting reminder of Legacy’s commitment to help families of service personnel who have given their lives or health during war service and peacekeeping. We are delighted to share this with the people of Melbourne as a meaningful addition to our city’s unique laneway arts culture.”

Legacy’s ANZAC Centenary Street Art Mural has been brought to life by artist Sankar Nadseon, the Mosaic Man.

For further information, please contact Janice Mascini: Ph: 0409 862 389 or email
Janice Mascini

To download a copy of the media release, please click here


The Voice of Youth


Victorian Legacy Junior Public Speaking Award runner-up Mia Decleva from Overnewton Anglican Community College, Taylors Lakes with Melbourne Legacy President Graeme Plumridge and the winner Marietta Stents from Genazzano FCJ College in Kew

Legacy’s Victorian Junior Public Speaking Award final showed the extraordinary talent of future leaders with an outstanding field of twelve finalists aged from 12 to 14 years.

Congratulations to all the finalists:
1. Alex Vander – Whitefriars Catholic College, Donvale
2. Mia Decleva – Overnewton Anglican Community College, Taylors Lakes
3. Matthew Duffy – St Patrick’s College, Ballarat
4. Marietta Stents – Genazzano FCJ College, Kew
5. James Keam – Wantirna College, Wantirna
6. Charlotte Brewis – Newhaven College, Phillip Island
7. Aaron Korczak-Krzeczowski – Kew High School, East Kew
8. Kelsey Hislop – St. Mary of the Angels Secondary College, Nathalia
9. Georgia Warden – Catholic College Bendigo, Junortoun
10. Zacch Seah – Melbourne Grammar School, Melbourne
11. Imogen Duff – The Geelong College, Newtown
12. William Maligin – St Kevin’s College, Toorak

Marietta Stents, 14, from Genazzano FCJ College in Kew took out first place, and runner-up was Mia Decleva, 14, from Overnewton Anglican Community College in Taylors Lakes. Both will represent Victoria in the Legacy Junior Public Speaking Award national final in Adelaide in November.

The twelve finalists were selected from 478 students from across Victoria who participated in regional finals. They competed in the state final which was held at the Telstra auditorium on 21 October. Each student had to prepare a five-minute prepared speech on a subject of their choice, followed by a two-minute impromptu speech about ‘Whilst standing in a queue’.

Marietta’s topic, ‘The Never Ending Battle’, was inspired by an image of Pompey Elliott, a WWI veteran who committed suicide after the war, which is on the RSL building in Camberwell.

Mia’s speech was called ‘Personal Effort’ and was about her grandfather Charlie, and his experience as an immigrant who came from Europe to Australia and worked hard to make a new life here.

The three judges were: Barb Dunlop, Royal South Street Society; Gordon Archer from Melbourne Legacy; and retired school Principal Bill Schrank. They judged the students on their language, clarity, pace, colour and ability to engage the audience.

“The public speaking skills of the finalists were of an extremely high standard and they all spoke eloquently with confidence,” Barb said.

Each finalist was presented with a medal, a certificate and a copy of The Australian Pocket Oxford Dictionary courtesy of Oxford University Press. The winner received a perpetual trophy and $300 and the runner-up received a trophy and $200.
The Legacy Junior Public Speaking Award began in 1988 to help young people appreciate the ideals of Legacy which includes voluntary service, caring, mateship and remembrance, and to encourage students to develop poise and self-assurance by using language to convey their point of view.

Janice Mascini
Ph: (03) 0409 862 389 or email
Janice Mascini

Twelve finalists competed in the 2016 Victorian Legacy Junior Public Speaking Award held on 21 October

Download a copy of the media release here

New CEO at Melbourne Legacy



Mr Justin Elwin is the new Chief Executive Officer at Melbourne Legacy which maintains the commitment to help the families of service personnel who give their lives or health during war service and peacekeeping.

“Justin served with distinction in the Australian Regular Army as an Infantry Officer for 22 years, most recently as the Commanding Officer of the 6th Battalion in Brisbane,” Melbourne Legacy President Graeme Plumridge said. “He also has a continuing passion to serve his community, and brings deep insight and understanding of contemporary veterans’ issues.”

During his Army career, Justin served in East Timor, Iraq and Afghanistan and has led teams of up to 850 people. In a range of executive-level positions, he has been responsible for large corporate projects and has led a number of major change programs, including one significant transformation program that achieved more than $80 million in savings and enduring reform. Justin is also a passionate advocate for veterans’ welfare and suicide prevention, gender equality, and diversity and inclusion.

“I am thrilled to be joining Legacy at a pivotal time in Legacy’s history, where the needs of veterans and their families have arguably never been greater,” Justin said.

“Since joining the organisation’s ranks as a Legatee when I moved to Melbourne earlier this year, I have experienced first-hand the support that Legacy provides to current and serving veterans and their loved ones. I’m extremely proud to be appointed to this position and I take very seriously my responsibility to help steer the organisation over the coming years.”

Legacy’s work with Defence Force families can mean a child gets an education and a fair go, a widow is not disadvantaged and alone, and a family is not torn apart by the effects of Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder.

Justin is currently completing a Master of Business Administration at Melbourne Business School, and holds a Bachelor of Management from Southern Cross University and a Graduate Diploma in Strategic Studies from the University of New South Wales.

For further information please contact:
Janice Mascini
Ph: (03) 0409 862 389 or email
Janice Mascini

Download a copy of the media release here

Legacy Carries Torch For Veterans’ Families


One of the many aspects of Legacy’s family support is about delicately assisting a spouse and their children to offer relief, so they can deal with the raw emotions of an immediate crisis. As one of Australia’s most iconic charities, Legacy has been caring for families of Defence personnel who have given their lives or their health for their country since 1923.

“Sometimes our work can be about the little things that make a big difference,” President of Melbourne Legacy Graeme Plumridge said. “We help families with pension applications and other advocacy support, but practical assistance can provide immense peace of mind.

“Recently we assisted a partner of an Afghanistan war veteran who was suffering post-traumatic stress disorder. The veteran was unable to work and was undergoing treatment. The couple, who had a 10-month old baby girl and a three-year old boy, was struggling to pay household bills. Legacy stepped in to help with expenses to give them breathing space and a chance to focus on his health.”

Legacy supports around 80,000 families and the organisation’s role continues to evolve to accommodate their changing needs. People of all ages can receive the services Legacy offers from babies to ageing widows – the oldest client is 104 years of age.

“We connect our widows and a small number of widowers with support services and focus on promoting positive ageing and friendship groups,” Legatee Plumridge said. “For the children, we concentrate on education and assist with schooling costs together with scholarship opportunities at primary, secondary and tertiary education levels. There are also camps and outings so they can connect with other kids going through similar experiences.

“In addition Legacy cares for dependants with a disability who range in age from 25 to 80 years and monthly recreational days and camps are held. These social breaks are as important for the dependant as they are for their parents and carers.”

Founded on the ANZAC tradition of mateship, compassion, fairness and honesty, Legacy is the only organisation of its type in the world and relies on its volunteers, known as Legatees, and donations to carry out its work.

“Legatees are the backbone of our services as they keep in regular contact with the families who need it. It is this personal interaction that provides our Legacy families with much needed reassurance that someone is watching out for them.”

During Legacy Week from 28 August to 3 September, many volunteers will be in the community selling badges and Legacy bears. Please buy a badge to show your support, or donate online at
Melbourne Legacy. For more information call 1800 534 229.

For further information or interviews on behalf of Melbourne Legacy please contact:
Janice Mascini
Publicity Manager
Ph: 0409 862 389 or email
Janice Mascini

Download a copy of the media release here

Widows Honour Fallen Loved Ones


Legacy Sunday is a poignant reminder of the impact of war back home, and that for each serving Australian who risks everything, a family does the same.

Hundreds of war widows will remember and honour their loved ones at a special service at the Shrine of Remembrance on 28 August.

“Legacy has supported veteran families for more than 90 years to help them overcome hardship and provide a network of caring support,” Melbourne Legacy President Graeme Plumridge said. “While much of our work is devoted to the welfare of older widows, Legacy is also seeing more and more young men and women returning from recent and current deployments with injuries, both psychological and physical.

“Our service at the Shrine is a time-honoured tradition that is highly valued by our Legacy widows and it signals the start of Legacy Week, our annual fundraising event. Legacy’s services are dependent on the generosity of donations and our volunteers, known as Legatees, to continue the care for around 80,000 families whose spouse or parent has been killed or injured.”

Legacy widow, Valda Dyke who is 89 years of age has been attending Legacy Sunday for 10 years.
Valda’s husband, Kevin, was in the Army and served in the Korean War. When he passed away in 1970, Valda was left with their two teenage children to raise alone. “Legacy was an enormous help to me during that time. They assisted with school fees, gave the kids ready access to a doctor and dentist and invited them to camps and activities,” Valda said.

“Once the children were older, I became a founding member and President of Legacy’s Coburg Widows’ Club which recently had its 30th anniversary. I really appreciate the friendship and support the group has given me. We share our ups and downs and it has helped me to stay positive and happy.”

During Legacy Week from 28 August – 3 September, hundreds of volunteers will be in the community selling badges and Legacy bears, please watch out for them to show your support.

You can donate online at
Melbourne Legacy or call 1800 534 229. You can also follow Melbourne Legacy on Facebook and Twitter.

For further information or interviews on behalf of Melbourne Legacy please contact:
Janice Mascini
Publicity Manager
Ph: 0409 862 389 or email
Janice Mascini

Sue Pigdon
Managing Director, Integrate Communications
Ph: 0419 154 490 or email
Sue Pigdon


Download a copy of the media release here

Students Tour to Western Front


Study Tour To Western Front

Nine Junior Legatees (JLs) from Victoria are joining the Legacy Pozieres Educational Study Tour to the Western Battlefields in France from 15 to 29 July. They are Jess and Tim Potter, Jakki Kedjae, Brenton Noye and Evan Rodwell from Melbourne Legacy; Claire, Keegan and Lewis Short from the Bendigo Legacy Club and Nathan Barnes is from the Legacy Mornington Peninsula Club.

Tour Patron Corporal Mark Donaldson VC will lead up to 80 Junior Legatees from across Australia on the trip and the signature event will be the Commemoration of the Battle of Pozieres on 23 July.

Participants of the tour will learn about the impact that Australians had on the outcomes of the Western Front major battles and the lives of local French people. They will walk the ground, analyse the battle and terrain, under expert guides and historians and experience first-hand the challenges and sacrifices endured by the ANZACS.

Each JL has to complete two study tasks. The first was the allocation of a solider to research and the second task is to prepare a reflections paper after the Tour.

Jess, who is 20 years of age, was assigned Lieutenant Colonel Ignatius Bertram Norris from the 53rd Battalion. He died at 6pm on 19 July 1916, from machine gun fire on one of the worst nights of battle – more than 3,000 Aussies were killed. He was 34 years of age, just married and his wife had a son that he never saw.

“It means a lot to go to see where it all happened,” Jess said. “The sacrifices our Aussie soldiers made were enormous. I feel I have a strong connection with the events at Pozieres through the research I have done on Lieutenant Colonel Norris. I am sure it will be an emotional journey.”

To find out more about Legacy and its work, go to
Melbourne Legacy Facebook

For further information or interviews on behalf of Melbourne Legacy please contact:
Janice Mascini
Publicity Manager
Ph: 0409 862 389 or email
Janice Mascini

From left: Claire and Keegan Short, Evan Rodwell and Jess and Tim Potter

Download a copy of the media release here

Students Foster ANZAC Spirit


Thousands of school children are keeping the ANZAC spirit alive as they come together for Legacy’s 85th ANZAC Commemoration Ceremony at the Shrine of Remembrance to honour the Aussie service men and women who did not return home and the devastating loss to their families.

The Honourable Linda Dessau AM, Governor of Victoria and Legacy’s Patron said Legacy has always been there for families of veterans to minimise hardship as a result of death or injury and the connection to youth through the Commemoration Ceremony has endured and grown.

“It is heart-warming to see the thousands of Victorian students who turn up each year to remember those lost in times of war and embrace the ANZAC values of mateship, compassion, fairness and honesty.”

The students who attend Legacy’s Commemoration Service will receive a sprig of rosemary as a symbol of remembrance. They will be invited to proudly wear their relatives’ medals, lay wreaths and display their school banners.

Highlights of Legacy’s ANZAC Student Commemoration Service at the Shrine of Remembrance will include a RAAF fly-over, Guard of Honour, and moving renditions by the Melbourne High School band and the Mac Robertson’s Girls’ High School choir and a young Bugler sounding the Last Post.

Templestowe College year 12 student and Junior Legatee, Levi Schumacher will participate in the Ceremony and receive the Legacy Torch – the undying flame of service and sacrifice.

Levi’s dad, Mark, was in the Navy and sadly passed away in 2009. As a skilled artist Levi would like to be a graphic designer and Legacy is helping him with his education costs to support him to achieve his ambition. Levi also enjoys the companionship of Legacy’s youth activities.
“Legacy has been like a second family to me,” Levi said.

The 2016 Legacy ANZAC Commemoration Ceremony for Students was supported by the Victorian Government and the Victorian Veterans Council.

Today, Legacy support around 90,000 families of those service personnel who have given their lives or health during war service, peacekeeping and disaster relief operations.

“The organisation’s role continues to evolve to accommodate their changing needs, including those affected by Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder,” Melbourne Legacy Graeme Plumridge said. “This year we have also offered Defence Force Personnel subsidised child care for ANZAC Day at the RMIT City Campus Children’s’ Centre to enable them to attend commemorative services if they don’t have family support.

Service personnel interested in this service should contact Margaret or John Ph: 9662 1295 or email
RMIT Child Care. Bookings are essential and must be made before Wednesday 20 April.

For further information or interviews on behalf of Melbourne Legacy please contact:
Janice Mascini (Ph: 0409 862 389) Sue Pigdon (Ph: 0419 154 490)
Melbourne Legacy
Ph: 0409 862 389 or email
Legacy Marketing


Download a copy of the media release here

Legacy Offers Child Minding To ADF


Legacy is offering families of permanent full-time, past or current Australian Defence Force Personnel the opportunity to use RMIT’s accredited City Campus Children’s Centre to mind pre-school children on ANZAC Day. There are 60 places so early bookings are essential.

When: Monday 25 April

Time: Any time between 0800 and 1500 hours

Where: RMIT City Campus Children’s Centre, Building 85, 97 Franklin Street, Melbourne

Cost: $30 per child flat rate

Bookings: Contact Margaret or John Ph: 9662 1295 or email childcare.city@rmit.edu.au
Bookings are essential and must be made before Wednesday 20 April.

Parents can attend the ANZAC Day services and commemoration activities knowing their pre-school children will be well cared for by qualified staff for a subsidised rate. Parents are required to bring food for their child or children left in care and nappies if required.

Legacy has been caring for families of Defence personnel who have given their lives or their health for their country since 1923, particularly in more recent times, those impacted by Post Traumatic Stress Disorder. The organisation’s role continues to evolve to broaden its services and accommodate changing needs.

For further details or to arrange interviews on behalf of Melbourne Legacy please contact:
Janice Mascini
Acting Marketing and Communications Manager
Ph: 0409 862 389 or email
Janice Mascini

Download a copy of the media release here

No Stopping Dave


In 1988, at the age of 19, Dave Jacka had a motorbike accident leaving him with quadriplegia. With only six per cent physical function remaining, he was confined to a wheelchair, paralysed from his armpits down, with limited arm function, no use of his fingers and unable to regulate his body temperature. But physical limitations have not stopped Dave.

On 1 March, Dave set off on a three-month journey covering 2,225 km, to become the first person with quadriplegia to paddle the Murray River from Lake Hume dam wall to the sea to challenge his own physical and mental limits.

Dave’s aim is to show that we all have the ability to unlock the true potential of the human spirit. The Paddle Wheel Murray River Expedition’s purpose is to demonstrate this through innovation, and persistence of an individual with a disability, highlighting that a person’s true potential is limited only by what they believe.

Dave is no stranger to stepping up to a challenge. He has travelled the long journey from relearning to feed himself, to representing Australia at the 1996 Paralympics (Wheelchair Rugby), to becoming the world’s first person with quadriplegia to fly solo around Australia in 2013 – flying the aircraft by his mouth and two arms with limited function. The flight took 38 grueling days with a support crew of six people and two support aircraft.

His grandfather, Albert Jacka was awarded a Victoria Cross in 1915 for his courage and bravery during WWI – a trait that is obviously in the Jacka genes.

Dave and the team hope to encourage people to question what they believe is possible, to step outside their comfort zones and have a go at following their goals, passions or dreams.

The public will be taken on the journey as they follow the progress of the expedition via Dave's website
davejacka.com. Regular updates on his progress and experiences are on Facebook https://www.facebook.com/dave.jacka.

Dave is still looking for a support boat crew member during May who has an adventurous spirit and is physically fit. If you would like to know more, contact Dave at
 dave@davejacka.com.

For further details or to arrange interviews on behalf of Melbourne Legacy please contact:
Janice Mascini
Acting Marketing and Communications Manager
Ph: 0409 862 389 or email
Janice Mascini


Download a copy of the media release here

New President for Melbourne Legacy


Graeme Plumridge was installed as President of Melbourne Legacy on 20 March 2016.

Graeme has been involved with Legacy since 2008 and has served as Chairman of the Inner Eastern Branch and for the last two years and was also Treasurer and a Director of Legacy Australia Inc.

He served in the Army as a National Serviceman and spent 12 months in Vietnam. After leaving the military, he completed his training as an accountant. Graeme is a Fellow of CPA Australia, and in conjunction with another Director, ran a successful mechanical services business for 26 years in Wangaratta and later in Melbourne.

“It is an absolute privilege to take on the role as President of Melbourne Legacy,” Graeme said.

“Legacy has been caring for families of Defence personnel who have given their lives or their health for their country since 1923,” Graeme added. “My focus will be to ensure our organisation continues to evolve to accommodate the changing needs of our families, including those affected by Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder.”

For further details or to arrange interviews on behalf of Melbourne Legacy please contact:
Janice Mascini
Communications Manager, Integrate Communications
Ph: 0409 862 389 or email
Janice Mascini


Download a copy of the media release here

Hearing the Voice of Youth


Every year, Legacy hosts a National Junior Public Speaking Award, a competition designed to celebrate young Australians with talents in public speaking.

The competition has been running for 28 years and its popularity is evident in the thousands of entrants participating from across Australia. The winners of this award, judged on their skills in the use of language and their speaking ability, will receive prizes worth up to $500. They will also enhance their communications skills, which even in today’s high tech society is a great way to open doors to future career prosperity.

This competition is open to students between 12 and 14 years old and applications must be registered through their school. Each student is required to do a five minute speech about a topic concerned with one of the ideals of Legacy which includes voluntary service, social justice, caring, personal effort, personal sacrifice and mateship. They also have to do an impromptu speech of two minutes - a topic will be provided and the student has five minutes to prepare their presentation. Students will be assessed on their use of language, logic and speech.

Last year’s Victorian winner and national runner-up, Alicia Ranasinghe from Our Lady of Mercy College in Heidelberg, described her experience as “kind of scary, but also a lot of fun.”
“I was a little nervous in the beginning, but each time I presented I felt more confident and relaxed,” Alicia said. “It has helped me at school and will give me a head start when I decide on a career.”

Entrants will compete in regional events from May to August, with a state final in October, where two students from Melbourne will be chosen to compete in the national final in November. There is no fee to register or participate and travel for state finalists to attend the national final is covered. For applications or enquiries, contact Melbourne Legacy either by
Ph: 8626 0500 or email
Lisa Bennett, or download the registration form from the website here.

Applications close on 29 April 2016.

For further details or to arrange interviews on behalf of Melbourne Legacy please contact:
Janice Mascini
Communications Manager, Integrate Communications
Ph: 0409 862 389 or email
Janice Mascini


Download a copy of the media release here

Legacy Promotes Positive Aging


A group of ladies ranging in age from 78 to 90 years from the North Balwyn Legacy Club have taken up Nordic Walking which helps them stay active, healthy and happy.

Melbourne Legacy provides services to around 12,500 Veteran widows, many of them are over 70 years of age, and the organisation has been working with specialists, including Occupational Therapist Shane McSweeney, to develop health related programs to promote positive aging.

Nordic Walking (NW) is an innovative program for older people which teaches posture and movement skills. It is also particularly beneficial for those who are vision impaired or who have had a stroke.

As the poles travel behind you (like Nordic cross country ski poles) once they engage with the push of your hand they will not only push you forward, but also upwards. This subsequently reduces the weight bearing load on your ankles, knees, and hips by up to 20 per cent. As there is less weight travelling through your legs the NW poles help you to move more easily and faster. While using the poles you use more calories as you have to engage your shoulders and back muscles to move the poles.

“As many of our widows are elderly providing services that keep them active and socially connected go a long way in maintaining good health and independence,” Community Services Manager Cassandra Gerrard said. “There are around 30 Legacy Widows’ Clubs and people regularly attend the Clubs for meetings in their local area to enjoy the company of their own friendship group. But we are also encouraging them to get active.”

Shane has been visiting Clubs and writing a regular column in Melbourne Legacy’s magazine, which the widows receive every two months, to promote the benefits of positive aging by enhancing independent living skills, providing helpful advice on improving health and lifestyle and the importance of keeping active with activities such as Nordic Walking.

“Feedback I receive is that even when people are not using the NW poles they are thinking more about their posture and they move more effectively,” Shane McSweeney said.

“Since starting Nordic Walking last year I feel much more confident and I can walk a little faster and for a longer period of time,” Ava Heupt said. “I’m 89 years of age and I still live independently which I would like to continue to do as long as possible and this activity is helping me to do just that. We always end the session with a coffee and a chat so it is a nice way to connect with friends.”

As one of Australia’s most iconic charities, Legacy has been caring for families of Defence personnel who have given their lives or their health for their country since 1923. Legacy’s role continues to evolve to accommodate the changing needs of Veteran families, including those affected by Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder. People of all ages are dependent on the services of Legacy from babies to elderly widows – the oldest is 109 years of age.

For further details or to arrange interviews on behalf of Melbourne Legacy please contact:
Janice Mascini
Communications Manager, Integrate Communications
Ph: 0409 862 389 or email
Janice Mascini


Download a copy of the media release here

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